the sally sisson blog


September 7, 2012

New Content for a New School Year: Copywriting and back-to-school angst

copywriting and content For anyone working in educational marketing, communications or publishing, back-to-school begins long before August. But no matter how much content has been printed, published or posted in advance, the first week of school still brings its share of back-to-school angst.

For me, the first week of school presented a hodgepodge of projects for K-12 and edu:

Web content:

Writing and posting two new web pages for Inly School, an independent preK-8 Montessori school in Massachusetts.

Marketing copywriting:

Writing email blasts for K-5 teachers to promote this year’s new Subway Random Acts of Fitness for Kids, a national campaign for SubwayKids.com (for ad agency Jack Morton Worldwide).

Video scriptwriting:

Conceptualizing, writing and editing script for a new admissions video for a Catholic high school in Connecticut (for Keating Associates).

Copywriting:

Coining slogans and signage copy for a new sustainability campaign for a large university (for Hall Pass Group).

A crazy week, and crazy deadlines, but all fun stuff. I’ve got my #2 pencils sharpened and my colored folders and Mac files in order (well, almost).

Happy September!

* pencil illustration (created by Mark A. Hicks) from Discovery Education‘s Clip Art Gallery.
No Comments

June 19, 2012

Content marketing + cause marketing: Public relations with a purpose

content marketing for SUBWAY

Copywriting + corporate clients

Around this time last summer, I was busily dealing with my own child’s end-of-school activities while developing a year’s worth of content for SUBWAY Kids™ (via the Boston office of ad agency Jack Morton Worldwide).

For the Random Acts of Fitness for Kids™ project, developed to promote physical fitness and healthy habits in elementary schools throughout the U.S., I devised 365 “random” content snippets, 52 weekly activities, 12 mini field day activities and a culminating field day program. I also wrote copy for a teacher’s guide, teacher calendar and planner, classroom poster, and collateral for teachers and parents. All in about two weeks while trying to leave on my own summer vacation. Phew.

Cause marketing + bonus branding

content marketing for Subway KidsSUBWAY® Restaurants has had a successful string of win-win partnerships with select organizations and government institutions, and is now widely known for its commitment to the fight against childhood obesity.

For the Random Acts of Fitness and related campaigns, SUBWAY Kids™ partnered with We Can!™ (a National Institutes of Health (NIH) program), the American Heart Association and Little League® Baseball and Softball.

For another campaign on conservation, it partnered with The Nature Conservancy to provide reusable lunch bags and educate kids about the importance of recycling, reusing and reducing waste. [See my blog post: Earth Day interactives: Copywriting with a conscience for corporate clients.]

The SUBWAY restaurant chain is now the largest in the world. According to the Wall Street Journal it surpassed McDonald’s last year as the world’s largest chain, in units sold. Not that it can be attributed to savvy cause marketing, but heck, they must be doing something right in the brand department.

Useful content for a range of constituents

June is field day season in American elementary schools, and also a time when restless kids get summer fever. The “Random Acts” guide also features quick exercises and activities that kids can do in the classroom to get their bodies moving and minds re-focused.

It also extends into the summer months, with ideas for at-home activities and seasonal recipes right through the last days of August, when kids are bored and restless once again, waiting for school to begin…

Happy summer!

(This year, I’m outa here!)

 

 

 

 

1 Comment

March 21, 2011

10+ Tips on Combating Creative Block

Thanks to readers for responding to my last blog post:

March Madness: Celebrating creativity and the (sometimes maddening) creative process

image from williamsrandall.com

Tracy Graves, digital + social media consultant
B4South
When I’m stuck, the world easily descends into a maelstrom of despair. And then, to re-jigger myself, I spend oodles of time looking at other people’s work. I try and take the pressure off and create something for myself instead of for a client. I read something utterly escapist and don’t worry about whether I’m intellectually furthering myself. And most importantly, I accept the fact that I need to get at least 5 crappy versions of something out of the way, and then something will emerge worth keeping.

Christopher Harting, photographer + philosopher
Christopher Harting Studio
Go to Manhattan. Walk around and look at stuff. Drink coffee. Walk around some more. But you know the truth? I never have that problem. Never, ever, ever.

John DiCocco, creative director, writer + editor
(and reporter for the Tiny Mind Gazette)

I’m pretty fortunate in that I have rarely suffered this dreaded event, except when writing ad copy. And when that occurs, I have a standby tactic. I start asking outlandish questions:
“What if the whole thing was blue?”
“What if your parents spoke two different languages and you didn’t understand either one?”
“What if you knew everything that was going to happen one hour ahead of time?”

What’s the worst that could happen—I mean, really, the WORST?
Okay, backtrack from there. “What if it/he/the nation were twice/half as big/small/loud/dense/bright etc?”

Michael Calienes, creative director + copywriter
Transplant
Self-induced water boarding.
Cuban music in the background.
Freedom.

Kelley Rugg, producer, director, writer + videographer
Rowboat Productions
Creativity is not about making or forcing but about allowing and trusting, and so what I do when I feel any type of block is understand that I am causing it by trying too hard… so then I let go, get out of the way, and absolutely keep going.

Trebor Healey, poet + novelist
treborhealey.com
I think it’s best to shift your surroundings, take a trip, small or big, spend time in nature…go to museums, dance performances, concerts…other creative ventures will inspire your own, will put you in the creative reality. If all else fails, revisit your favorite writers’ or artists’ work like a bee dropping in on the hive of honey and you will once again know how to get to the flowers you seek.

Doug Eymer, creative director + designer 
EYMER Design Laboratories + Think Tank
Procrastination is such a negative term. I prefer to think of it as getting all of your ducks in a row.
Here’s the real dear, you awake from hibernation in a cranky mood. Your immediate reaction to EVERYTHing is: “I’m right, the LOSERS that have been grinding their teeth all winter are WRONG!”
So, because you have been asleep and avoiding the family check book, you stand at the very end of the protective barriers and say, “So What! I have been dead for the last couple of months, what is the difference in a few eternal centuries more?”

Doug Williams, writer + director
@Writeous Outrage and FUSE5
Here’s one from the director I worked with in NY during my playwriting days. She said the best way to beat block was to find famous quotes on the subjects (or themes) you’re writing about, and then make them your own.
The quotes serve as idea factories that 1) give you another perspective; 2) take you in a direction you’d likely have never found yourself; and 3) reinvigorate the internal creative process by making you think about something familiar in a completely different way. I’ve been doing that for years – in screenplays, novels, speeches, PR/marketing, online writing, et al – and it’s never failed me once.

David Game, academic publisher (+ nice husband)
Terence Rattigan, British playwright, was advised to join the RAF [Royal Air Force] to cure writer’s block.

Joe Lee
@ joelee.me
When in doubt or stuck, I doodle. Doodling to me is active so it literally gets me going. It’s my physical technique to kick start a mental stream of consciousness. Since my doodles are not even worthy of being called a sketch, they are uninhibited and uncensored. Also, I use scraps of paper, napkins, recycled printed sheets, anything that has no feeling of preciousness whatsoever, not even post-its or sketchbooks. (Think about how many artists who like to flaunt and show off their “sketchbooks.”) Start here, there, or anywhere – JUST DOODLE IT. As Bucky Fuller once said, “How often I found where I should be going only by setting out for somewhere else.”


1 Comment