the sally sisson blog


March 8, 2016

Road Map for Content Writing

 

Content_Writing

A Writing GPS: The Step-by-Step Guide to Creating Your Next Piece of Content [Infographic]

A step-by-step process? Really? Why not just wing it? Why not just… write?

Because in writing, argues Ann Handley, process is necessary. Because, as she says, you need a road map to get you to where you need to be.

Handley’s handy GPS gets you from one place to another: “from discombobulated thoughts to a coherent, cogent piece of writing.” Numbered steps prompt you to pause and think:

1. What’s your business goal?

2. How does your idea relate to your readers?

3. What credible sources and data support your idea?

4. What format would best communicate your point? (Blog post, infographic, case study?)

5. Who is your audience? (Write to one person. Period.)

Now start writing.

Write, walk away, rewrite, walk away. Write, edit, edit again.

Pass it by a co-worker or read it to your cat. Proofread. Polish. Is it ready to publish?

Call to action.

Check the 12 steps. Have you left readers hanging? What should readers do next?

Subtly prompt, nudge, guide, steer or drive in the right direction to reach the desired outcome or destination.

Now push the button and pat yourself on the back. Stretch, breathe, crack your knuckles, relax.

Before you write your next post, read Ann Handley’s Everybody Writes: Your Go-To Guide to Writing Ridiculously Good Content.

Because, as Ann says, “in today’s content-driven world, writing matters more… not less.”

Tags: ,
Posted in: etc

No Comments

February 8, 2013

Snow Fall: An exceptional piece of interactive multimedia journalism

Interactive multimedia content

Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek, by John Branch

Captivating.

This is one of the most impressive interactive news stories I’ve seen. Click the picture above and experience it for yourself. Grab a cup of hot chocolate and watch the whole thing. Trust me, it’s that well done.

Behind the scenes.

It took more than 11 staffers at the New York Times more than six months to complete. One can only imagine the budget. To learn how this interactive news story was made, read this Q & A with the graphics director, multimedia producer, video journalist and editor who worked on the project:

How We Made Snowfall:
A Q & A with the New York Times team

“The New York Times’ astonishing Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek, launched in the final days of 2012, capped a year of extraordinary work in interactive journalism, both at the Times and in newsrooms around the world. In the six days after Snow Fall’s launch on December 20th, 2012, it had received more than 3.5 million page views and 2.9 million visitors, nearly a third of whom were new visitors to the Times website.”

Disclaimer from an armchair reporter

I am neither an adventurous skiier, nor an adventurous sports person of any sort. But as a young girl I spent many weekends on the bunny slope at Stevens Pass, the setting of this story. I remember stories of my older brothers skiing at Seventh Heaven, as well as stories about my dad almost dying while climbing Mount Rainier.

My family moved from Seattle to Boston when I was five years old, and I spent occasional winter weekends on intermediate slopes while friends raced down black diamonds.

But I admire great storytelling and was quickly drawn in by this piece. I am excited to see what this team, and others like it, come up with next.

Best wrap-up I’ve read

The Atlantic: ‘Snow Fall’ Isn’t the Future of Journalism
Journalists will continue to find more options and build more tools to astonish us. Stuff like this will get better and better and slightly more frequent, one hopes. But it won’t become, generally speaking, frequent….

Give “Snow Fall” the respect it deserves. It doesn’t need to bear the augury of “journalism of the future.” It’s just a rare and sensational gift for readers in the present. That’s quite enough.

 

 

 

 

No Comments

September 7, 2012

New Content for a New School Year: Copywriting and back-to-school angst

copywriting and content For anyone working in educational marketing, communications or publishing, back-to-school begins long before August. But no matter how much content has been printed, published or posted in advance, the first week of school still brings its share of back-to-school angst.

For me, the first week of school presented a hodgepodge of projects for K-12 and edu:

Web content:

Writing and posting two new web pages for Inly School, an independent preK-8 Montessori school in Massachusetts.

Marketing copywriting:

Writing email blasts for K-5 teachers to promote this year’s new Subway Random Acts of Fitness for Kids, a national campaign for SubwayKids.com (for ad agency Jack Morton Worldwide).

Video scriptwriting:

Conceptualizing, writing and editing script for a new admissions video for a Catholic high school in Connecticut (for Keating Associates).

Copywriting:

Coining slogans and signage copy for a new sustainability campaign for a large university (for Hall Pass Group).

A crazy week, and crazy deadlines, but all fun stuff. I’ve got my #2 pencils sharpened and my colored folders and Mac files in order (well, almost).

Happy September!

* pencil illustration (created by Mark A. Hicks) from Discovery Education‘s Clip Art Gallery.
No Comments